Women’s March on Washington

What a historic moment to be a part of. I am so incredibly amazed by the millions of people who united and came out to support the Women’s March on Washington. For those who couldn’t make it to DC, there were also large marches being held in other cities.

I am grateful for all the women and men in my life who continue to support and fight for women’s rights. Let us continue to speak out, and make history for our families and communities.

Women’s Equality Day

An important mark on women’s history began 95 years ago. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on August 18, 1920, allowing women the right to vote after a decade long battle for equal rights. Tennessee became the the 36th state to ratify, the last state to help make the 19th Amendment official for women to vote. On Aug 26, 1920, women achieved the right to vote in the US, putting it into effect.

Today, we celebrate women’s equality day “(…and a day to reflect on how far we still have to go — in the spirit of those women who protested and organized for a fundamental right nearly a century ago, we must do more to ensure equality for all women).”

While a win in 1920 was a big accomplishment, the fight for women’s equality is still occuring. Women’s equality is just as important now as it was 95 years ago. Women today are still struggling to gain respect and acceptance.

The inequality among women and men today is visible, and women find it difficult to overcome it when gender stereotypes are enhanced by society. Some of these stereotypes today include the lack of gender diversity in STEM careers. 95 years ago, the voices of women weren’t even acknowledged. With the rejection of their opinions, there was no chance of women even close to becoming scientists. Gender stereotypes create discrimination for women in the workforce. According to Wired, the STEM wage gap between men and women in the U.S. is almost $16,000 per year. 45 percent of women are also more likely than men to leave their careers due to what they consider is a hostile work environment. On average in 2010, full-time working women only made 77 cents to every dollar a man earned.

In this photo released by China’s Xinhua news agency, China’s first female astronaut Liu Yang waves as she comes out of the re-entry capsule of Shenzhou-9 spacecraft in Siziwang Banner of north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region Friday, June 29, 2012. Liu and two other crew members emerged smiling from the capsule that returned safely to earth Friday from a 13-day mission to an orbiting module that is a prototype for a future space station. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Wang Jianmin)

In February of 2013, President Barack Obama said, “One of the things that I really strongly believe in is that we need to have more girls interested in math, science, and engineering. We’ve got half the population that is way underrepresented in those fields and that means that we’ve got a whole bunch of talent not being encouraged the way they need to.”

Suffragists like Alice Paul of the National Women’s Party, who was present for the ceremony of the 19th Amendment to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucrieta Mott, who organized the Seneca Falls Convention, were symbols of women rights. They fought for women equality during different times, and they continue to be an important part of history.

U.S. Army First Lt. Shaye Haver, center, and Capt. Kristen Griest, right, pose for photos with other female West Point alumni after an Army Ranger school graduation ceremony, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, at Fort Benning, Ga. (John Bazemore, AP)

Looking back, we have come a long way of creating historical change for women. Many ask and say, “Why continue to fight?” or “Other countries are dealing with far worst women rights issues.” We fight because gender inequality still exists everywhere, and the women seeking for change 95 years ago is shaking their voices at why women still have to bear through it. We fight because without the courage to voice our own opinions and ideas, we wouldn’t have women scientists, women military captains, women artists, women activists (the list goes on) today!

Nellie Bly

Photo courtesy of Newseum

Happy 151st Birthday to Nellie Bly, who paved the way for female journalists. I first learned about Nellie during my visit to the Newseum. Her career launched when she got her job at the Pittsburgh Dispatch by writing an angry response to a misogynistic column. From there, she went to extreme lengths to find the best news to report. She became known for her investigative reporting on harsh conditions at a women’s asylum. Her adventurous and fiery spirit also led her on a solo journey around the world in just about 72 days. I admire her for giving the ones who’ve been told to shut up, as sung by Karen O in the cute Google Doodle video.

Happy Earth Day

DSC_0124-001

Happy Earth Day! We know it as an annual holiday that demonstrates support for environmental protection, but I believe this holiday should be celebrated every single day of our lives. We as humans should become more conscious about the world we are living in. The world isn’t as beautiful and clean as we want it to be, so we need to realize that we are part of the ecosystem, and trampling onto it with an unconscious mind will lead to a harmful and unhealthy planet. Give it love and care.

After sounding like a hippie dippie, let me proclaim how much lovin’ this planet does truly needs. We live in a beautiful planet, but us humans sure know how to destroy it. Let’s do our best to keep it in tact. Okay?

How to live eco-friendly:

A DIFFERENT KIND OF TRANSPORTATION || BIKE, WALK, SKATEBOARD, ROLLERBLADE (IF THAT’S STILL COOL) – BUT WHY NOT? FOR THE ENVIRONMENT!

I live in a city, so public transportation is usually the popular choice for commuting. Good thing Washington D.C. happens to be one of many cities to have a bike sharing program, where people can rent bikes to ride around the city to work or tourist attractions. Look out to see if the city you are living in has a bike share program! A lot of cities are developing these bike share programs to become more sustainable. Walking is also another good option. You will certainly feel better about yourself because you are a contributing factor to helping the environment and your own health. And if financial issues are a main concern for you (when is it not for anybody), you will be saving a lot of money. Nothing like getting exercise, giving your wallet a break, and saving the world!

MEATLESS MONDAYS

I was vegetarian for 6-7 years, and I no longer live that lifestyle due to dietary issues sadly. If you want to give the environment a healthier outlook, I say go meatless by following a vegetarian/vegan diet or maybe just on Mondays. Why meatless? According to MeatlessMondays, “The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization estimates the meat industry generates nearly one-fifth of the man-made greenhouse gas emissions that are accelerating climate change worldwide . . . far more than transportation. And annual worldwide demand for meat continues to grow. Reining in meat consumption once a week can help slow this trend.”

SPRING CLEANING (WHAT’S IN YOUR CLEANING PRODUCTS?)

Keeping your home and living space clean is a priority (especially at our apartment). Finding the right cleaning products to keep your space clean is beneficial for the environment and your health. Breathing in harsh chemicals is damaging to your body, and it can also lead to death if the wrong chemicals are mixed. Switch to eco-friendly cleaning products. Some of my favorite cleaning products that we use in our apartment are Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day.

WAKE THE EARTH!

This last one is the easiest way to show your compassion to the Earth. Wake up the people around you, and show how conscious and aware you are about our environment. Tell them about the benefits of recycling, biking, going vegetarian, etc. to this planet. Not fully aware of what is wrong with the Earth? Educate yourself. Follow up on how climate change and global warming is occurring, or the increase in pollution is harmful to so many animals and organisms including ourselves. Awaken the human population, and voice out that you don’t want to live on a planet that is slowly crumbling. Wake the earth!

 

Women’s Day

Desktop5-001

(The influential women in order: We can ALL do it! // Hilary Clinton // Eleanor Roosevelt // Malala Yousafzai // Michelle Obama // Daw Aung San Suu Kyi)

I never got to write about International Women’s Day, but I wanted to finally get the chance to put this blog post together. How can we not appreciate a day where we can celebrate the progressive change that influential and inspiring women have achieved for our world and each other. The women above are just a few who have created an enormous impact on myself and others.

As a woman and minority, I like to address how lucky I am to live in a generation where social change is more accepting. The struggle and fight for women rights, along with war, racism, and hatred still remains. Women strive for more acceptance and equal rights everyday, where this kind of initial action is a powerful motive and stepping stone in ending gender inequality. While this strive is ongoing, women must continue to educate everyone that women rights is human rights. As an Asian American woman, I’m confident and proud that woman of all races can create inspiring change for themselves and others. I have no intention of being cheesy. I want to be completely straightforward, and address that this is a very important issue to me. Speak out, and be brave. Rosie the Riveter said, “We can do it!” And I say, “We can ALL do it!”